Meditation Archives - Page 11 of 16 - Madhu Bazaz Wangu
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Meditation

Sixty-Eighth Chapter

Sixty-Eighth Chapter Tao-te Ching A skillful leader of troops is not oppressive with his military strength. A skillful fighter does not become angry. A skillful conqueror does not compete with people. One who is skillful in using others puts himself below them. This is called virtue of non-competing. This is called the strength to use men. This is called matching Heaven, the highest principle. # As I Understand It: Early in our lives we are taught that in order to win we must defeat our opponent. In this chapter the sage advises to reverse our thinking, to make noncompetition our strength, to see yourself in your adversary. A good fighter is the one who is neither angry nor violet. Instead of being hateful towards your opponent think of him as your partner in this dance of life. You will be victorious....

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Sixty-Seventh Chapter

Sixty-Seventh Chapter Tao-te Ching The entire world says my Tao is great! Tao is not something that can be bought at a marketplace. If it were it wouldn't be great. I have three treasures, which I guard. The first is mercy. The second is frugality. The third is humility. From mercy comes courage. From frugality comes generosity. From humility comes leadership. But if we are courageous without having mercy, If we are generous without being frugal, If we lead without being humble, The death is certain. Love conquers all attacks, It is impregnable in defense. When Heaven wants to protect someone it does not send an army. It protects with love. # As I Understand It: Many say they know Tao. Only those who are kind, simple and humble know it. Most people are oblivious to anyone or anything that gets in their way, and ruthless with...

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Sixty-Six Chapter

Sixty-Sixth Chapter Tao-te Ching The sea is the king of all the mountain streams Because it stays below them. Humility gives it its power. Those desiring superior positions must speak humbly. Those desiring to lead must follow. When the sage places himself above the people, They do not feel his weight. When he places himself in front of the people, They do not feel hurt. The sage stays low so the world never tires of exalting him. He stays subservient so the world never tires of making him the king. # As I Understand It: Be humble. Learn from the sea. Stay low and hundred streams will flow to you. The sea never lords its greatness. People are attracted to those who are humble and who do not dominate. Stifle your habit of interfering and telling others what to do. Even if you're richer,...

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Sixty-Fifth Chapter

Sixty-Fifth Chapter Tao-te Ching Those who practice Tao well Do not seek to enlighten others, Make them aware of their ignorance. People who think they know the answers are difficult to govern. He who thinks he has all the answers is a robber of the state. He who is simple hearted and blended with the people is a blessing to the state. One who knows these two things also knows the secret. Simplicity is a profound and secret virtue. Not using cunning is a deep virtue. Be content with an ordinary life. Show people the way back to their original state. Then complete harmony will be reached. # As I Understand It: "I don't know" is a powerful phrase. This chapter, meant for politicians, may be also read from a personal point of view. The sage says don't force your rules upon the people you...

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Sixty-Fourth Chapter

Sixty-Fourth Chapter Tao-te Ching What remains still is easy to manage. What is not yet manifest is easy to plan for. What is brittle is easy to crack. What is small is easy to scatter. Deal with things before they appear. Put things in order before disorder arises. A tree that fills a man's embrace grows from a tiny shoot. A tower of nine stores begins with a heap of earth The journey of a thousand li starts with a single step. He who takes action fails. He who grasps things loses them. The sage takes no action and therefore does not fail. He does not grasp and therefore does not lose. People usually fail when they are about to succeed. So be as careful at the end as at the beginning, then there will be no failure. The sage does not treasure what is...

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Sixty-Third Chapter

Sixty-Third Chapter Tao-te Ching Practice nonaction. Work without doing. Taste the tasteless. Magnify the small; increase the few. Reward bitterness with care. See simplicity in the complicated. Achieve greatness in little things. Take on difficulty while it is still easy; do great things while they are still small. The sage does not attempt anything very big, and thereby achieves greatness. If you make rash promises, you will be little trusted; Because the sage always confronts difficulties right away, he never encounters them. # As I Understand It: Trillions of moments make up our lifetime. All we ever have to do is to live in the present moment to make life effortless. Instead of worrying about a future that has not even arrived do tiny things and achieve big tasks. Sage says confront difficulties the moment you face them--bitter moments with objectivity, lovable with...

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Sixty-Second Chapter

Sixty-Second Chapter Tao-te Ching Tao is the storehouse of all things. It is the good man's treasure and bad man's refuge. Fine words can gain honor And fine deeds can gain respect from others. Even when a man is bad, has Tao ever rejected him? On the occasion of crowning an emperor or installing the three ministers, Rather than present large pieces of jade preceded by teams of four horses, It is better to kneel and offer this Tao. Why did the ancients highly value this Tao? Did they not say, "Those who seek shall have it and those who sin shall be freed? For this reason it is valued by the world. # As I Understand It: There is a treasure house deep within us-the wondrous wellspring of the Tao. When we are in tune with this space we know the source of...

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Sixty-First Chapter

Sixty-First Chapter Tao-te Ching A big country may be compared to the lower part of a river. It is the converging part of the world. It is the female of the world. The female always overcomes the male by tranquility, And by tranquility she is underneath. A big state can take over a small state if it places itself below the small state. And a small state can take over a big state if it places itself below the big state. Thus some, by placing themselves below, take over (others), And some, by being (naturally) low, take over (other states). After all what a big state wants is but to annex and herd others. And what a small state wants is merely to join and serve others. Since both big and small states get what they want, The big state should place itself low. # As...

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Sixtieth Chapter

Sixtieth Chapter Tao-te Ching Governing a big country is like cooking a small fish, You spoil it with too much poking. Approach the world with the power of Tao And evil will have no power. Although evil is powerful, with Tao in our hearts, it cannot harm us. It cannot harm and sage too is protected. If the ruler and his people refrain from harming each other, The virtue and its benefits will be accumulated in the country. # As I Understand It: Don't interfere without, cultivate a sacred space within. We view the world with fear. If we cultivate an inner awareness, we gain courage. The Tao awareness shields us with an invisible areole. The evil cannot penetrate it. When we stop having fearful and negative thoughts the wicked powers become impotent. Fear begets more fear and...

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Fifty-Ninth Chapter

Fifty-Ninth Chapter Tao-te Ching To rule people and to serve Nature there is nothing better than frugality. Only by being frugal can one learn to restrain. To restrain oneself means to accumulate virtue heavily. By the heavy accumulation of virtue one can overcome everything. If one can overcome everything, then there are no limits. When a man knows no limits, he is fit to lead. This is the way to be deeply rooted and firmly planted in the Tao-- The secret of long life and everlasting vision. # As I Understand It: When we cultivate virtues such as frugality, restraint and moderation there's nothing impossible for us to do. The one who lives according to the Tao has a chockfull of such virtues. She exemplifies virtuous life and encourages others to make choices based on such high standards. An individual...

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