Reading Archives - Page 10 of 15 - Madhu Bazaz Wangu
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Fifty-Second Chapter

Fifty-Second Chapter Tao-te Ching The source of the universe is the Mother. He who knows the source discovers the ten thousand things. He who discovers the ten thousand things and holds on to the Mother, He is free from danger. Close the mouth. Guard the senses. And life will be peaceful. Open the mouth. Meddle with people's affairs. And life will be hopeless. See small, see clearly. Be flexible, be strong. See the radiance and save yourself misfortune. This is called the practice of eternal light. # As I Understand It: Lao Tzu has symbolized the Tao as water, deep valley or, mother, as in this chapter. He says that human life, from birth to death, is not a straight line. What lies before our physical existence and after, is a mystery having maternal qualities. Like a mother, it sustains us throughout our lives. But unlike...

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Fifty-First Chapter

Fifty-First Chapter Tao-te Ching Tao produces the ten thousand things. Te (Virtue) fosters them. Circumstances and tendencies complete them. Therefore the ten thousand things esteem Tao and honor te. Tao and te are free, spontaneous, perfect. Therefore all honor the way of Tao and value its te. Because the Tao gives them life, Te nourishes and nurtures them, Rears, protects and shelters them. The Tao produces them but does not take possession of them. It gives but does not expect. It leads but does not master. This is Tao's profound and hidden virtue. # As I Understand It: The Tao, our source of being, is not merely physical. We are born with a mystery, with spontaneity that sages call te. If I were merely material at birth with a predetermined role of who I am and how I should function in a family, in community, in...

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Fiftieth Chapter: Tao-te Ching

Fiftieth Chapter Tao-te Ching Man comes in to life and goes out to death. Three out of ten are companions of life. Three out of ten are companions of death. And three out of ten in their lives lead from activity to death. And for what reason? Because of man's intensive striving after life. I have heard that one who is a good preserver of his life will not meet tigers or wild buffaloes, And in fighting will not try to escape from weapons of war. The wild buffalo cannot butt its horns against him, The tiger cannot fasten its claws in him, And weapons of war cannot thrust their blades into him. And for what reason? Because in him there is no room for death. # As I Understand It The fear of death is at the top of the list of all our dreaded fears....

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Forty-Ninth Chapter

Forty-Ninth Chapter Tao-te Ching The sage has no fixed mind. He regards people's needs as his own. Those who are good he treats with goodness. Those who are bad he also treats with goodness. Those who are kind he treats with kindness, And he is also kind to those who are unkind. The sage lives in harmony with all. He sees everything as his own self. He loves everyone as his children. All people are drawn to him. He behaves like an infant. # As I Understand It The sage observes himself and others. He does not judge. Like the sage, observe without criticizing. Observe people's culture, religion, family relationships and politics. In time, divisions and categories "I" and "them" will become superfluous. When you stop judging yourself you will stop judging others and see yourself in "them." Extend the hand of friendship even...

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Forty-Eighth Chapter

Forty-Eighth Chapter Tao-te Ching The practice of learning consists of daily accumulation. The practice of Tao consists of daily diminishing. By continuous diminishing one reaches a point of no action. When nothing is done, nothing remains undone. Mastery is gained by letting things go their own way. Nothing is gained by interfering. # As I Understand It Increasing knowledge refines intellect. Wise do not accumulate knowledge, especially meaningless facts and purposeless details. Spirituality is cultivated by diminishing it. Accumulation gives us a different perspective-we collect, we gather, we hoard. Our ceaseless desire to possess things is never quenched. But when we decrease stuff-by giving, gifting, granting, we feel refreshed. A feeling of freedom takes over. Our link with inner self strengthens; that strength cannot be stolen, it does not die. Let's become aware of things that surround...

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Forty-Seventh Chapter

Forty-Seventh Chapter Tao-te Ching   Know the world without going out the door. See the Way of Heaven without looking out the window. The further one goes, the less one knows.   Therefore the sage knows without venturing forth, Knows without looking, Accomplishes without striving. #   As I Understand It:             We are brought up to believe that effort and striving are necessary for success. But this verse suggests “accomplish without striving.” What does it mean?             Within the spiritual context the act of enlightenment involves no action at all. The sincerity and deep feelings within us can connect us to the world without our taking even a step.             In this information age we can get in touch with people in seconds and reach the farthest corner of the world within hours. But has that helped us to know ourselves better or made...

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Forty-Sixth Chapter

Forty-Sixth Chapter Tao-te Ching   When the Way (Tao) prevails in the world, Galloping horses fertilize the fields. When the Way does not prevail in the world, Warhorses are bred in the countryside.   There is no greater loss than losing the Tao, No greater curse than covetousness, No greater tragedy than discontentment; No greater disaster than wanting more and more.   Contentment alone is enough. Indeed, the bliss of eternity can be found in contentment. #   As I Understand It:             Do you evaluate yourself based on how much wealth you have accumulated or on how content you are?             The country that has lost its Way (Tao) evaluates itself on its power, control over other countries and its wealth. It is perpetually preparing its warheads (horses). But the country that is in touch with its Tao uses its horses to tend the fields.             For you to understand...

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Forty-Fifth Chapter

Forty-Fifth Chapter: Tao-te Ching What is most perfect seems to be incomplete; but its utility is unimpaired. What is most complete seems to be empty; but its usefulness is inexhaustible. What is most straight seems to be crooked. The greatest skill seems to be clumsy. The greatest eloquence seems to stutter. Haste overcomes cold, (But) tranquility overcomes heat. By being greatly tranquil, One is qualified to be the ruler of the world # As I Understand It: Stop seeing the world with ego coated eyes! (Here ego seems to mean an euphoric sense of self.) When we exaggerate our self-worth, things that are whole seem incomplete. But when we see with the stillness within our hearts, what seemed awkward earlier looks perfect; what we heard as stutter, sounds eloquent. We assess our world with a sweeping glace. We think our way of looking is...

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Forty-Fourth Chapter

Forty-Fourth Chapter: Tao-te Ching Which do you love more, fame or your life? Which is more valuable to you, wealth or your life? What you gain is more trouble than what you lose. Love is the fruit of sacrifice. Wealth is the fruit of generosity. He who is contented is never disappointed. He who knows when to stop is free from danger. Only thus can you endure long. # As I Understand It: Look within and examine what is truly important to you. Are your cravings unquenchable? Instead of being trapped into the vicious cycle of limitless desire get connected to the tranquility of Tao. With that link the need for fame and possessions will cease. Look around; love is available in abundance-only if you have heart to feel it. As our priorities change we realize that the chase for...

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Forty-Third Chapter

Forty-Third Chapter: Tao-te Ching The softest things in the world overcome the hardest things in the world. That without substance (non-being) penetrates that where there is no space. Hence I know the value of non-action. Performing without actions-- Teaching without words- This is the way of the sage. Few in the world can understand it. # As I Understand It: Water penetrates surfaces where there's no space. Quietly in slow motion it carves away even granite. Let's live like water-let's go off the pressure to be better and faster than others. Let tension cease, task simplify, performance level improve. Let softness become a source of power and overcome others' hardness. Master paints effortlessly. Author flows without force. Creator's life is that of non-action--as soft as water. Softer we become easier is our life. People who lead their lives effortlessly are...

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