Madhu Bazaz Wangu | Writing & Meditation
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Writing & Meditation

Chapter Four: Dhammapada

Chapter Four: Dhammapada "Fragrant Life" 44. The garland-maker seeks flowers and gathers the most beautiful ones. 45. As when an aspirant searches for a spiritual path, and chooses the path of dharma. On this path he goes beyond the realms of death and of gods. 46. He who knows that this body is the foam of a wave, the shadow of a mirage, breaks the flower tipped arrows of Mara, the god of death. Death can never touch him. 47 & 48. As a torrent of rushing water sweeps away a slumbering village, death sweeps away those who spend their lives half-awake gathering flowers of sensuous passions. 49. The ones fully awake live without injuring nature, as the bee drinks honey without harming flower's beauty or perfume. 50. Think not the faults of others, of...

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Chapter Three: Dhammapada

Chapter Three: Dhammapada "Thoughts" 33. Thoughts are restless, difficult to restrain. The wise straighten their thoughts just as an arrow-maker straightens his arrows. 34. Like a fish on dry land thrashing in agony, a novice meditator agonizes to escape from the power of Mara, the lord of temptations and death. 35. Thoughts are difficult to restrain, they go wherever they want and fancy whatever they wish. But a trained mind is a source of health and joy. 36. The wise can guard their elusive and subtle thoughts wherever and whenever they choose. A well-guarded mind is a source of great joy. 37. He who can guard his thoughts, that wander aimlessly, is free from the bonds of death. 38. He whose mind is unsteady and restless does not know the path to Dharma. 39. But he whose...

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Chapter Two: Dhammapada

Chapter Two: Dhammapada "Being Watchful" 21. Watchfulness is the path of immortality: unwatchful-ness is the path of death. Those who are watchful go beyond death: those who do not watch are already dead. 22. The wise understand the importance of vigilance and rejoice in the wisdom. 23. The wise strive for Nirvana in meditation and attain infinite joy and freedom. 24. The man who meditates earnestly, pure in mind, kind in deed, leading a disciplined life in harmony with the teachings arises in glory. 25. The spiritually disciplined man can make an island for himself that can never be overwhelmed by floods. 26. The foolish are never watchful; but the wise consider watchfulness as their greatest treasure. 27. They never surrender to sloth and carelessness and attain the supreme happiness. 28. The wise overcome sloth through...

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Chapter One: Dhammapada

Chapter One: Dhammapada "Choosing the Right Path" 1. Our life is the reflection of our thoughts. Suffering follows an evil mind as the wheels of a cart follow the oxen that hauls it. 2. What we are today is shaped by what we thought yesterday. Joy follows a man with pure mind as his own shadow. 3. "He insulted me, he hurt me, he defeated me, he robbed me." Those who think thus will never be free from hatred. 4. "He insulted me, he hurt me, he defeated me, he robbed me." Those who do not think such thoughts will be free from hatred. 5. Hate cannot conquer hate; love can. This is the eternal law. 6. 'All lives come to an end,' those who remember this will end quarreling. 7. Mara, the Tempter overwhelms the one who frantically pursues personal pleasures--eats carelessly and is...

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Eighty-First Chapter

Eighty-First Chapter Tao Te-Ching True words are not beautiful; Beautiful words are not true. A good man does not argue; He who argues is not a good man. A man who has virtue does not look for faults. He who looks for faults has no virtue. The sage does not accumulate anything But gives everything to others. Feeling he has more, he gives more. Heaven is good to all, Injuring no one. The sage imitates it, acting for good of all and opposing no one. # As I Understand It: Authentic words, simply spoken, need no ornamentation. They feel good. Argumentative and judgmental words agitate the mind. Possessing people and accumulating things leave us hollow. The sage neither possesses nor accumulates. The more we give, the more we receive. We don't know how, but it works! Today, allow someone else...

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Eightieth Chapter

Eightieth Chapter Tao Te-Ching Imagine a small country with few people. They have weapons and do not employ them; they enjoy the labor of their hands and do not waste time inventing labor saving machines. They do not travel far. Since they dearly love their homes. They are not interested in travel. Although they have boats and carriages no one uses them. They relish their food, beautify their clothing, are content with their homes, and delight in their way of life. Though they live in the sight of their neighbors, and crowing cocks and barking dogs can be heard across the way, they leave each other in peace while they grow old and die. # As I Understand It: Lao Tzu dreamed of an idealized society-an ideal agricultural society--in which he lived. With no violence or war, no senseless hatred for other people's ideologies,...

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Seventy-Ninth Chapter

Seventy-Ninth Chapter Tao Te-Ching After a bitter quarrel, some resentment remains. What can one do about it? Being content with what you have is always best in the end. Someone must risk returning injury with kindness, or hostility will never turn to goodwill. So wise always give without expecting gratitude. One with true virtue always seeks a way to give. One who lacks virtue always seeks a way to get. To the giver comes the fullness of life; to the taker, just an empty hand. # As I Understand It: When we hold on to resentments we give away our inner power. Whoever in your life stirs negative emotions in you--boss, ex-husband, mother-in-law, son or sibling-it drains your energy. "Hostility will never turn to goodwill" unless you reverse the feeling and return hurtful feelings with forgiveness. Those who follow the way of the Tao...

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Seventy-Eighth Chapter

Seventy-Eighth Chapter Tao Te-Ching Nothing in the world is softer and weaker than water. But for attacking the hard and the unyielding, nothing can surpass it. The weak overcomes the strong: The soft surpasses the hard. In the entire world, there is no one who does not know this, but no one can master the practice. Therefore the sage remains serene in the midst of sorrow. Evil cannot enter his heart. Because he has give up helping, he is people's greatest help. True words appear paradoxical. # As I Understand It: Lao Tzu had special reverence for the attributes of the elements of nature. One of his favorites was water. As mysterious as the Tao, he recommended emulating it's behavior. Water is persistent and patient. It yields. Gentle, patient and yielding individuals wear away harsh and hardhearted. Water settles at the lowest levels. Those...

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Seventy-Seventh Chapter

Seventy-Seventh Chapter Tao Te-Ching Way of the Tao is like the drawing a bow. The high is lowered, the low is raised. When it is excessive, it reduces. When it is insufficient, it supplements. The mankind is the opposite: It reduces the deficiency and supplements the surplus. It strips the needy to serve those who have too much. Only the one who has the Tao offers his surplus. The sage keeps giving because there is no end to his wealth. He acts without expectation, succeeds without taking credit, does not think he is better than anyone else. # As I Understand It: The way of the Tao maintains balance. When there is surplus, it reduces; when there is deficiency, it increases. But people do not follow the Way. They are always interested in themselves and do not share their excess. Those who follow the...

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Seventy-Sixth Chapter

Seventy-Sixth Chapter Tao Te-Ching A man is born tender and weak. At his death he is stiff and hard. All things, including the grass and trees are tender and supple in life; dry and brittle in death. Therefore stiffness is a companion of death; flexibility a companion of life. An army that cannot yield will be defeated. A tree that cannot bend will break in the wind. The hard and stiff will be broken; The soft and supple will prevail. # As I Understand It: The most durable things in nature are soft, gentle and adaptable. Water adapts itself to any shape, trees and grass bend in storm, and newborns bend their limbs like a great yogi. Lifeless things are hard, dead bodies stiff. Rigid thoughts and stubborn conduct are unexciting, supple and flexible stimulating. Living things are pliable. By being adaptable...

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